One of the few areas of EPA policy continuity between the Biden and Trump eras is the aggressive enforcement attention being paid to products that claim to fight the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus.

While EPA has long prioritized enforcement of the rules governing antimicrobial products (disinfectants and the like), the current pandemic has elevated that focus substantially, particularly against products that claim or suggest effectiveness in fighting coronavirus and other microbes. Some of the more high-profile actions over the last year have targeted on-line sales of products (often imports) that are not registered with EPA to make antimicrobial claims, as required by the Federal Insecticide Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA).

In a January 2021 update to a COVID-related compliance advisory first issued in May 2020, EPA reiterated its aggressive enforcement stance, with an emphasis on internet product sales:

“EPA is receiving a steady stream of tips/complaints concerning potentially false or misleading claims, including efficacy claims, associated with pesticides and devices. These tips and complaints are being actively reviewed and efforts are being made to identify violative products. EPA intends to pursue enforcement against products making false and misleading claims regarding their efficacy against the coronavirus. EPA is particularly concerned with pesticide and pesticide device products sold online on e-commerce platforms that are fraudulent, counterfeit, and/or otherwise ineffective. EPA is also coordinating with the U.S. Department of Justice, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, and other federal partners to bring the full force of the law against those selling or otherwise distributing violative products.”

The updated EPA advisory also highlights agency concerns with products improperly claiming long-lasting anti-viral effects (so-called “residual claims” that a product “provides an ongoing antimicrobial effect beyond the initial time of application, ranging from days to weeks to months”). Such claims only are allowed if approved by EPA and “supported by acceptable studies demonstrating satisfactory residual efficacy,” consistent with agency guidance issued in October 2020.

EPA’s updated advisory also expands on, and somewhat shifts, the agency’s discussion of pesticide “devices” (e.g., UV lights, ozone generators, and other instruments that use physical or mechanical means to control pests, including viruses and other germs) that claim to kill the coronavirus. Unlike chemical pesticides, devices are not required to be registered by EPA and, therefore, are not scrutinized by the agency to ensure they are safe to use or work as intended. [Note that devices must meet other EPA requirements, including being labeled with an “EPA Establishment Number” to identify the facility at which the device was produced, and not being marketed with “false or misleading” claims.] While EPA does not review efficacy data for these products, manufacturers must have on file adequate substantiation for the claims they make. Interestingly, the May 2020 advisory noted that “devices may not be able to make claims against coronavirus where devices have not been tested for efficacy or safety for use against the virus causing COVID-19 or harder-to-kill viruses.” This language has been replaced in the January 2021 advisory with a more general reminder that

“[M]aking false or misleading labeling claims about the safety or efficacy of a pesticidal devices is prohibited and could result in the issuance of a Stop Sale, Use, or Removal Order and penalties ….”

In addition, on the litigation front, EPA continues to fight two novel challenges to the scope of the agency’s enforcement authority. In the first case (Zuru LLC v. EPA), filed in September, the company is challenging EPA’s determination that its cleaning wipes are an unregistered pesticide, and blocking its importation, because the wipes contain an active ingredient found in a number of other EPA-registered disinfectants; of website statements made by third party resellers that the wipes are “disinfectants” and “kill germs”; and the product name “‘Bactive’ implies bacterial fighting properties.”

The second case, Tzumi Innovations v. EPA, filed in December, similarly involves objections to EPA’s designation of the company’s hand wipes (typically for use on the human body and an FDA-regulated product) as an unregistered pesticide and a threatened Stop Sale, Use, Or Removal Order (SSURO). EPA filed a new brief in that case on February 3 asserting that the matter is not ripe for review and, substantively, that the wipes are properly considered pesticides because they are being marketed for use on surfaces.

Both challenges provide a reminder of the extensive scope of EPA’s FIFRA authority, including over products that do not explicitly make antimicrobial claims, but imply such effectiveness through other statements or based on the presence of certain active ingredients. For a more detailed discussion, see my prior blog post.

A copy of EPA’s updated COVID Compliance Advisory “What You Need to Know Regarding Products Making Claims to Kill the Coronavirus Causing COVID-19″ is available here.

Find the replay of our webinar Cleaning Up From 2020: Guidance for Disinfectant, Germ and Virus Killing Claims here.

COVID-19 has brought a proliferation of products claiming to kill or otherwise inhibit viruses, bacteria and other germs. These products, before they can be legally sold, are heavily regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and sometimes both. Major enforcement actions are pending against companies making illegal claims or selling unregistered products. Meanwhile, the FTC regulates advertising of many sanitizing products and the agency has pursued enforcement on companies that overstate their products’ germ-killing performance.

Please join us for a webinar covering the basics of germ killing and related product claims.

Discussion topics include:

  • The regulatory landscape: Who regulates what – EPA, FDA and FTC jurisdiction and requirements
  • What can you say and when can you say it
  • Potential liability and enforcement considerations
  • What to do if you receive a warning letter or other enforcement action

Anyone who is currently making or planning to make pesticide products, microbiology laboratory personnel with efficacy testing responsibilities, manufacturers of sanitizing products including lights, retailers of sanitizing products, anyone new to claims or in need of a refresher should join us for this webinar.

To view the presentation slides, click here.

To view the webinar recording, click here.

Subscribe to our Ad Law News and Views newsletter to receive information on our next round of webinars and to stay current on advertising and privacy matters.

Visit the Advertising and Privacy Law Resource Center for additional information for additional information, past webinars, and educational materials.

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Welcome to our monthly roundup of regulatory and litigation highlights impacting the dietary supplement and personal care products industries.  Sit back, relax, and enjoy the read.  February was a short month, with a lot going on.

NAD

Health claim substantiation was front and center before NAD in a monitoring case involving Pendulum Therapeutics and a “medical probiotic” product featuring claims such as “The only medical probiotic clinically shown to lower A1C & blood glucose spikes for the dietary management of T2D*” (*Consult your physician as part of your total diabetes management plan.  Results may vary from person to person.”)

The advertiser submitted a 12-week multi-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study (the “Perraudeau Study”) to assess Pendulum Glucose Control’s safety and effectiveness in improving glycemic control in Type 2 diabetics and, ultimately, their dietary management of the disease – specifically, the role of certain probiotic strains found in prior research to be associated with the promotion of a healthy gut microbiome through the production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs).

The advertiser also provided clinical studies and research articles demonstrating the roles of A1C, fasting glucose and postprandial glucose levels in managing Type 2 diabetes. The advertiser also referred to the FDA’s Guidance document (Diabetes Mellitus: Developing Drugs and Therapeutic Biologics for Treatment and Prevention) to demonstrate what level of reduction in HbA1c was clinically meaningful.

While NAD expressed some concerns about the evidence, ultimately, NAD determined that the Perraudeau Study was a good fit for the challenged claim “The only medical probiotic clinically shown to lower A1C & blood glucose spikes for the dietary management of T2D*” (*Consult your physician as part of your total diabetes management plan. Results may vary from person to person.”) but recommended the following modifications: (1) limiting the claim to individuals who are taking metformin; (2) modifying the claim to clarify that the product can be used as part of the dietary management of type 2 diabetes; and (3) removing the references to percent reductions in blood glucose spikes in the absence of evidence in the record demonstrating that the reductions were clinically relevant.

This decision is a helpful discussion of the competent and reliable scientific evidence standard.  Anyone seeking to understand health claims substantiation better should check it out. Continue Reading Dietary Supplement and Personal Care Products Regulatory Highlights – February 2021

Welcome to our monthly digest of litigation and regulatory highlights impacting the food and beverage industry.  As it has been for many months, the story was mostly about what’s going on in the food court.  Let’s take a look….

Litigation

Vanilla, vanilla, and more vanilla….The plaintiff’s bar remains skeptical of any product labeled as vanilla.  Among the many vanilla-related lawsuits filed, McDonald’s, Whole Foods and Trader Joe’s defended suits alleging that their vanilla ice cream, vanilla almond milk, and vanilla almond cereal respectively were falsely labeled as vanilla.  However, in a win for industry, a NY federal judge found that Topco did not improperly label its vanilla almond milk, ruling that although the product is not exclusively flavored with real vanilla, the suit failed to allege that a reasonable consumer would believe that a vanilla milk’s flavor was solely sourced from vanilla.

Other flavorings haven’t been immune from scrutiny, though.  Frito-Lay appears to have settled a case involving allegations that the company’s cheddar and sour cream chips are misleadingly labeled.  The plaintiff alleged that the images of cheddar cheese and sour cream on the front of Ruffles-brand and Baked Lays Cheddar + Sour Cream Flavor potato chips, reasonable buyers would think that those ingredients flavor the chips.  In fact, plantiff claimed that Frito Lay used synthetic diacetyl to provide the sour cream flavor in the chips, but did not disclose the artificial flavor on the front of the packaging, as required per the FDCA regulations.

Consumers were also dismayed to find out that 7-Eleven’s Yumions may not, in fact, be made from real onions and, separately, that the Keebler elves allegedly may not be making their cookies with “real fudge”.

The lesson from these cases and others is that flavor and ingredient-related representations continue to face considerable scrutiny.  If businesses are updating labels or branding for the new year, it’s worth the time to review flavor descriptions and consider the arguments that these plaintiffs are asserting to help understand and assess risk.

(links from Law360, subscription req’d.)

FDA

FDA warning letters focused on claims that cause products to be considered unapproved new drugs, including claims featured on an aloe product relating to joint mobility, inflammation, and acid reflux.  In other enforcement, a Washington-state federal judge entered a consent decree against a juice processor accused of distributing adulterated juice products.

FDA published findings of its leafy greens e. coli outbreak investigation, identifying cattle grazing upslope from the growing area as the likely source of contamination.

In a recall turned class action litigation story, Midwestern Pet Foods, Inc., initiated a recall of multiple pet foods on December 30, related to the presence of aflatoxin.  Consumers whose pets perished after consuming the food recently filed suit alleging that the foods caused their pets’ deaths.

Undeclared allergens and potential presence of listeria monocytogenes and other contaminants were the most common reasons for food recall listed in FDA’s recall database.

Prop 65

Our sister blog, Kelley Green Law, featured two Prop 65 developments that may impact certain products, including Prop 65 warnings required on products that may expose consumers to THC and a proposal to minimize use of the short form warning format.  Also, although not directly in the personal care space, given the proliferation of many products that feature disinfectant claims, companies may want to note this post regarding EPA enforcement on unregistered disinfectants.

FTC

The FTC did not announce any food-specific settlements or litigation in January 2021.

NAD

NAD did not issue any food-specific decisions in January 2021, but see select dietary supplement highlights here.

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Thanks for reading our first installation of the food industry litigation and regulatory highlights.  See you in March!

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Welcome to our monthly roundup of regulatory and litigation highlights impacting the dietary supplement and personal care products industries.

NAD

NAD tackled substantiation for “#1 Dermatologist Recommended” claims in a challenge involving L’Oreal’s CeraVe moisturizer and use of syndicated survey data to support related claims.

Health claim substantiation was front and center in a Council for Responsible Nutrition-led challenge involving glutathione and the level of evidence required to support claims relating to low-glutathione levels.

FTC

Indirectly related to dietary supplements and consumer care, the FTC announced a settlement with app-maker Flo regarding allegations that the company shared the health information of users with outside data analytics providers after promising that such information would be kept private.

As we noted here, the FTC has new civil penalty authority relative to false COVID-related advertising claims and practices.

FDA

As it has since relaxing the regulatory standards relative to manufacturing of hand sanitizers in March 2020, FDA continued issuing warning letters related to hand sanitizer products that contain active ingredients other than those allowed per the hand sanitizer tentative final monograph, primarily methanol, and relative to hand sanitizers that are allegedly sub-potent.

The agency also continued its enforcement relative to COVID-related claims with warning letters issued to AusarHerbs and Allimax US (joint warning letter with the FTC), as well as non-COVID-related letters to companies whose products featured claims relating to joint health, hair loss, and inflammation, which caused the products to be considered unapproved new drugs.  The letters rely heavily on evidence from social media posts, blog posts, and product websites.

Prop 65

Our sister blog, Kelley Green Law, featured two Prop 65 developments that may impact certain products, including Prop 65 warnings required on products that may expose consumers to THC and a proposal to minimize use of the short form warning format.  Also, although not directly in the personal care space, given the proliferation of many products that feature disinfectant claims, companies may want to note this post regarding EPA enforcement on unregistered disinfectants.

Class Action Litigation

In a significant win for the dietary supplement industry, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the Northern District of California’s grant of summary judgment to Target Corp., ruling that state law false advertising challenges to permissible structure/function claims are preempted by the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.  See our blog post discussing the case here.

Other highlights from courtrooms around the country include…

Southern California skincare company Yes To Inc. agreed to pay $775,000 to a proposed class of consumers to resolve allegations it misrepresented the dangers of its Grapefruit Vitamin C Glow-Boosting Unicorn Paper Mask, which was recalled after a flood of consumers reported facial skin irritation and burning. (Law360 subs. req’d.)

A California federal judge has thrown out for the last time a proposed class action alleging that Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. and Bausch Health US LLC misled customers about the safety of their talc products, saying even after five chances to amend the complaint, the pleadings still fall short.  (Law360 subs. req’d.)

Skincare company Murad LLC was hit with a proposed class action claiming the company deceived buyers by wrongly representing its moisturizer as “oil-free” when the product actually contains oils.  (Law360 subs. req’d.)

A woman suing Charlotte’s Web Holdings Inc. argued that the CBD company shouldn’t be able to pause or escape her proposed class action over its labeling of products as dietary supplements, saying that identifying them as such violates state and federal laws. (Law360 subs. req’d.)  There are several cases involving this issue.  See a recent post on this issue on Cannabis Law Update.

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Thanks for reading our first installation of the dietary supplement and personal care monthly highlights.  See you in March!

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As we previously reported, “Phase I” of class action filings relating to the COVID-19 pandemic has become a significant contagion of its own with more than 500 cases being filed since March challenging refund policies, school closures, event cancellations, and marketing and pricing practices.  As the economy gradually reopens, “Phase II”—how companies respond to these cases—is just beginning.  Not surprisingly, defendants are fighting hard and early to defeat these claims, with many opting to file motions to dismiss rather than answering the complaint and entering into lengthy and expensive discovery.

Early Action in Cases Against Public-Facing Businesses

Public-facing businesses—such those in the retail, travel and hospitality industries—have been the first to re-open and are currently navigating a patchwork of state guidelines on how to do so safely.  Compounding this burden, these same companies are facing a wave of lawsuits by customers and employees alleging negligence, breach of contract, and unfair business practices during the pandemic.

These industries are not new to class action litigation and many companies have included arbitration clauses and class arbitration waivers in their consumer contracts.  These defendants have, not surprisingly, moved to compel arbitration, and plaintiffs have responded with unique (but likely ineffective) allegations of unconscionability, fraud and duress to try to stay in court.  For example, in a case against Amazon, the plaintiffs alleged that the arbitration agreement was unconscionable because they were under duress during the pandemic and were forced to purchase products from Amazon.  Amazon’s response was based on the black-letter principle that unconscionability is measured at the time of contracting, and not at the time of the challenged conduct.

Other companies have focused on substance, arguing that they complied with their contractual obligations and that their customers have not suffered damages.  For example, in the case of recurring monthly payments for fitness club memberships, defendants have argued that their membership agreements do not mandate refunds for temporary closures, and therefore plaintiffs who filed suit within days or weeks of the initial closure did so too quickly. Continue Reading What will “Phase II” of COVID-19 Class Actions Look Like?

Kelley Drye Advertising Law Summer Webinar Series This Wednesday, July 22
Selling Online: How to Avoid Flattening the Curve of an Uptick in Website Traffic
Register Here

COVID-19 has increased the already dizzying amount of online sales, making the applicable marketing requirements increasingly important. These rules affect not just how companies advertise and promote products and services online, but also how they bill and otherwise interact with consumers before, during, and after a transaction.

This webinar will include practical tips to help companies minimize risk of enforcement and litigation and provide practical guidance. Topics include:

  • Endorsers and Influencers
  • Promotions and Pricing
  • Subscription Plans and “Free” Trials
  • Shipping and Delivery
  • Consumer Reviews and the Consumer Review Fairness Act
  • Customer Service Considerations – how timely refunds and responsiveness can help reduce legal risks

Register Here

Kelley Drye Advertising Law Summer Webinar SeriesJuly 29
Cleaning Up From 2020: Guidance for Disinfectant, Germ and Virus Killing Claims
Register Here

COVID-19 has brought a proliferation of products claiming to kill or otherwise inhibit viruses, bacteria and other germs. These products, before they can be legally sold, are heavily regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and sometimes both. Major enforcement actions are pending against companies making illegal claims or selling unregistered products. Meanwhile, the FTC regulates advertising of many sanitizing products and the agency has pursued enforcement on companies that overstate their products’ germ-killing performance.

Please join us for a webinar covering the basics of germ killing and related product claims.

Discussion topics include:

  • The regulatory landscape: Who regulates what – EPA, FDA and FTC jurisdiction and requirements
  • What can you say and when can you say it
  • Potential liability and enforcement considerations
  • What to do if you receive a warning letter or other enforcement action

Anyone who is currently making or planning to make pesticide products, microbiology laboratory personnel with efficacy testing responsibilities, manufacturers of sanitizing products including lights, retailers of sanitizing products, anyone new to claims or in need of a refresher should join us for this webinar.

Register Here

July 30
California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) for Procrastinators: What You Need To Do Now If You Haven’t Done Anything Yet
Register Here

The coronavirus pandemic has put many things on hold, but CCPA enforcement is not one of them. The California Attorney General’s enforcement authority kicked in on July 1, 2020, and companies reportedly have begun to receive notices of alleged violation. In addition, several class actions have brought CCPA claims. Although final regulations to implement the CCPA have yet to be approved, compliance cannot wait.

If you’re not yet on the road to CCPA compliance (or would like a refresher), this webinar is for you.

We will cover:

  • Latest CCPA developments
  • Compliance strategies
  • Potential changes to the CCPA if the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) ballot initiative passes

Anyone who has not begun their CCPA compliance efforts or thinks they need a refresher should join us for this webinar.

Register Here

Also join our counterparts for:

COVID-19 Response Labor and Employment Labor and Employment Counseling and Compliance Labor and Employment LitigationTuesday, July 21
Not Normal: the Challenges of a Changed Workplace
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Four months ago, the Dow was close to 30,000, employment rates were at historic highs, the coronavirus was still “novel,” and millions had not yet taken to the streets in global protests against police brutality and racial inequality. The workplace we now return to exists in this supercharged social and political climate, with new rules, laws, risks and social issues creating new and uncharted waters for employers to navigate.  Join Kelley Drye’s Labor and Employment partners Barbara HoeyMark Konkel, and Kimberly Carter as they identify risks and share pragmatic solutions to these new challenges.  Topics will include:

  • Politics, speech and activism in the workplace
  • The changing role of HR
  • What “diversity” means now
  • New employment laws

Register Here

Advertising and Privacy Law Resource CenterFind replays of our webinars and other key resources relevant to advertising and marketing, privacy, data security, and consumer product safety and labeling on the Advertising and Privacy Law Resource Center.

Amid the flurry of products making coronavirus-related claims, some without legal approval or scientific support, one class of products raises unique questions:  so-called “pesticide devices,” like ozone generators and ultraviolet (UV) lights, which are instruments that claim to control pests — including viruses and other germs — through physical or mechanical means.  Unlike chemical pesticides, such devices are not required to be registered by EPA and, therefore, are not scrutinized by the agency to ensure they are safe to use or work as intended.

Accordingly, EPA recently issued an advisory that cautions:

Please note that ozone generators, UV lights and other pesticide devices may not be able to make claims against coronavirus where devices have not been tested for efficacy or safety for use against the virus causing COVID-19 or harder-to-kill viruses.

Pesticide devices, unlike some existing surface disinfectant products that have data on file with EPA showing effectiveness against similar viruses, are not eligible under the agency’s Emerging Pathogens Policy to make claims related to the coronavirus/SARS-CoV-2 or for inclusion on EPA’s “List N” of products deemed to be effective against the virus.

Pesticide devices, though not subject to registration, are subject to other EPA requirements.  For example, while devices will not have an “EPA Registration Number,” they are required to be labeled with an “EPA Establishment Number” to identify the facility at which the device was produced.  In particular, any claims made for devices may not be false or misleading, and, therefore, manufacturers should have data on file to substantiate any claims.  It is possible, therefore, that a device could be effective against coronavirus, and legally could make such claims, though companies should be prepared to defend the statements.  To do so, companies should look carefully at the criteria for claim approval in EPA’s Emerging Pathogens Policy.

EPA is actively pursuing enforcement in regard to illegal coronavirus claims, further information on which can be found at https://www.epa.gov/enforcement/covid-19-enforcement-and-compliance-resources.

Advertising LawEPA issued another in a series of recent advisories aiming to clarify for consumers and companies what they need to know about disinfectant products claiming to kill the coronavirus.  EPA is actively investigating the numerous tips and complaints it continues to receive concerning products marketed with possibly false and misleading coronavirus/COVID-19 related claims.

For some of these products, those claims have not been reviewed or accepted by EPA and, therefore, may present a risk to consumers, and healthcare providers in particular.

Products that claim to disinfect and kill or otherwise inhibit viruses, bacteria and other germs must be registered with EPA before they can be sold.  A disinfectant cannot make legal claims of effectiveness against a particular pathogen, such as SARS-CoV-2, unless EPA has specifically approved the claim as part of the registration process. Registration requires that any claim be supported by valid test data and an EPA determination that the product works as intended and is safe to use.

Earlier this year, EPA issued a list of disinfectants (“List N”) that meet the agency’s criteria for use against the coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2, the strain of coronavirus that causes COVID-19).  While the surface disinfectant products on List N have not been tested specifically against SARS-CoV-2, they are expected to work against the virus because they demonstrate efficacy against other viruses that are deemed harder-to-kill or another similar strain of coronavirus.

Please note that just because the product label states that it kills “99.5% of viruses,” this does not necessarily mean that it will kill coronavirus.

Consumers are reminded to follow the label directions for approved disinfectants — particularly regarding the amount of time the product must remain wet on the surface — to ensure effectiveness in killing the virus.  Use of a disinfectant in a manner inconsistent with label directions can pose safety risks, both from contact with the pesticide and from a false belief that the surface has been cleaned of the pathogen.

See my prior post on EPA enforcement activity in this area, as well as a more detailed description of EPA’s approval policy for products deemed effective against SARS-CoV-2.

EPA’s advisory is available here.  List N can be found at:  www.epa.gov/ListN.

This post updates an earlier post relating to marketing around the coronavirus.

We noted a couple news items this week that help add context to the pervasiveness of and risks related to price gouging enforcement.  In this story, the New York Times reported on a merchant who was selling hand sanitizer and related protective gear on Amazon, at profit levels that corresponded with the growing public concern. Amazon removed his listing along with hundreds of thousands of others and suspended thousands of sellers’ accounts for price gouging.  He’s now left with 17,700 bottles of hand sanitizer.

The California, Washington, and New York attorneys general offices are investigating price gouging complaints.  The New York AG issued multiple cease and desist letters last week relating to exorbitant prices on hand sanitizer and disinfectant spray.  The California AG issued a consumer alert regarding price gouging following announcement of a state of emergency.  The Washington AG issued a similar alert calling on consumers to report price gouging and scam products.

On the advertising claims front, the New York AG announced enforcement against Alex Jones, who operates the InfoWars website. TheCoronavirus Advertising-Related Enforcement Ongoing AG alleged that Jones was marketing and selling toothpaste, dietary supplements, and creams as treatments to prevent and cure the coronavirus.  The NY AG also issued cease and desist letters to Dr. Sherill Sellman, who was selling colloidal silver as a coronavirus cure, and to disgraced televangelist, Jim Bakker, for featuring claims that Sellman’s colloidal silver product could “eliminate [coronavirus] within 12 hours.”  The State of Missouri has also brought enforcement action against Mr. Bakker.

So, what’s the lesson?  In our prior coronavirus marketing post, the lessons were to know and understand the pricing laws and to avoid overstating the benefits of any product.  The follow-on issue is one of ethics and brand management:  We’re in a public health crisis.  Brands and platforms that demonstrate that they are working to comply with the law and take proactive consumer protection measures may forego short term profits, but they stand to gain long term consumer trust and maybe even generate some goodwill with regulators.

In addition to retail platforms, advertising and social media platforms may want to take note.  CDA Section 230 is alive and well but does any platform want to go to bat for advertising allegedly scam products?  The Washington AGs office stated that they will use their consumer protection laws to sue platforms or sellers even if they aren’t in Washington, as long as they were trying to sell to Washington residents.  Every other state AG undoubtedly agrees with this approach.

And finally for some comic relief…for some insightful advice from John Oliver, check out this link at the 17-minute mark.

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Join us for our next webinar, covering influencer issues, on March 24 by signing up here.

 

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