The California Food, Drug, and Medical Device Task Force announced a settlement this week with Goop, the lifestyle brand founded by Gwyneth Paltrow, which we’ve written about here and here. The complaint alleges that Goop made false and misleading representations regarding the effects or attributes of three products—the Jade Egg, Rose Quartz Egg, and

The Northern District of California recently ruled on DIRECTV’s motion for judgment on partial findings in a case where the FTC is seeking $3.95 billion in damages. The FTC’s case alleges that DIRECTV engaged in misleading advertising over a span of more than a decade and across a variety of media channels ranging from television

The FTC recently finalized updates to its Guides for the Jewelry, Precious Metals, and Pewter Industries, which provide the FTC’s interpretation of the jewelry marketing rules found in 16 C.F.R. §23.  The FTC hosted a roundtable in 2013, which we wrote about here, and considered stakeholder comments prior to finalizing the new Guides.  The updated Guides address a number of topics, including the surface application of precious metals, below-threshold previous metal alloys, gemstone products, and “cultured” diamonds.

What’s Changed

Some highlights of the changes include advising that jewelry marketers may:

  • Qualify if a coated product only has a service layer of a precious metal;
  • Advertise a product’s precious metal coating to assure reasonable durability;
  • Disclose the purity of coatings made with precious metal alloys;
  • Qualify a product’s gold karat fineness or a parts per thousand (PPT) designation for silver products that have less than 925 PPT;
  • Use alternative words and phrases for man-made stones (where it shares the same properties as the named stone) if they clearly and conspicuously convey that the product is not a mined stone.


Continue Reading

The Advertising Standards Authority of Ireland – similar to the NAD in the US – recently issued a decision regarding a social media influencer that companies on this side of the Atlantic should note.

The case involves social media posts by Rosie Connolly, a fashion, beauty, and lifestyle blogger. Connolly posted pictures with flawless makeup,

A federal jury in Illinois recently awarded Dyson, Inc. over $16 million in damages after finding that SharkNinja falsely advertised that its Rotator Powered Lift-Away vacuum was better than Dyson’s best-performing vacuum, the DC65.  SharkNinja ran ads that claimed that independent testing showed that the Rotator Powered Lift Away vacuum was proven to have “more

Laura Brett became the director of the National Advertising Division in August 2017. Law360 published a Q&A session with special counsel Jennifer Fried and Laura Brett that provides insight into the NAD, what we can expect in the upcoming years, Laura’s approach as the NAD director, recent noteworthy cases, the NAD’s deliberative process, and much

Florida attorney general Pam Bondi filed a complaint last week against Icebox Cafe, L.C. alleging that the restaurant violated Florida’s Deceptive and Unfair Trade Practices Act by making misleading claims that its food products were “locally-sourced” and “sustainable.”  The defendant operates a self-proclaimed “farm-to-table” restaurant in Miami Beach, along with select locations at airports.

According

Earlier this week, the FTC settled its case with BLU Products, Inc., a cell phone company the FTC claimed misled consumers about its privacy and data security practices. According to the agency, the company represented that it did not collect unnecessary personal information and that it imposed specific data security procedures to protect consumers’ personal information. But the FTC claimed not so fast, alleging that BLU allowed one of its partners, an advertising software company, to collect sensitive consumer information such as text message contents and call logs with full telephone numbers. The FTC also alleged that BLU failed to implement the security features it represented to consumers, allowing the company’s devices to be subject to security vulnerabilities that could allow third parties to gain full access to the devices.

In settling the case, BLU agreed not to misrepresent its data collection or data security practices. The order also requires BLU to clearly and conspicuously disclose: (1) all of the “covered information” that the company collects, uses, or shares; (2) any third parties that will receive this “covered information”; and (3) all purposes for collecting, using, or sharing such information. This disclosure must be separate from the company’s privacy policy or terms of use and the company must obtain the consumer’s affirmative express consent to the collection, use, and sharing of such information. “Covered Information” is defined as geolocation information, text message content, audio conversations, photographs, or video communications from or about a consumer or their device.
Continue Reading