Federal Trade Commission

Last week, the FTC announced that AT&T had agreed to pay $60 million to settle litigation over allegations that the company misled customers by advertising “unlimited” data plans that were subject to significant limitations. If you work in the mobile or broadband spaces, you should check out this analysis by our friends at CommLaw Monitor.

Yesterday, the FTC released a new guide and video designed to help influencers understand when and how they should disclose the relationships they have to the brands they endorse. The guidance doesn’t break new ground, and readers of this blog shouldn’t find too many surprises, but it does summarize the key requirements in an easy-to-read

The continuing questions over the extent of the FTC’s enforcement authority to obtain monetary relief under Section 13(b) did not stop the Commission from filing a lawsuit on November 1 against multi-level marketer Neora, LLC and its CEO Jeffrey Olson for purportedly operating an illegal pyramid scheme that used deceptive marketing to sell supplements, skin

FTC Commissioners Rebecca Kelly Slaughter and Christine S. Wilson recently sat down with Cameron Kerry at the Brookings Institution to discuss the FTC’s role in privacy. Although the Commissioners did not agree on everything, both identified the FTC as the best agency to enforce privacy wrongs. The Commissioners also shared their views on issues such

The reach of Section 13(b) of the FTC Act – and the extent of the FTC’s enforcement authority — has been a hotly-debated topic following the Third Circuit’s decision in Shire ViroPharma and the Seventh Circuit’s decision in Credit Bureau Center.  

In this first installment of what we are calling the “Section 13 (b)log,” we

On Tuesday, the FTC issued warning letters to three companies selling CBD products.  The companies, which FTC did not identify publicly, allegedly illegally advertised CBD products as being able to treat or cure serious diseases and health conditions without competent and reliable scientific evidence to support such claims. As we have written about previously,

The FTC and the New York Attorney General recently announced a record-setting $170 million ($136 million to the FTC and $34 million to the NY AG) joint settlement with Google. The settlement resolves allegations that YouTube violated the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (“COPPA”) and is the largest penalty the FTC has ever received in

Last week, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit cannonballed directly into the roiling waters of debate over the Federal Trade Commission’s enforcement powers, when it determined in a closely-watched appeal that the agency does not have the right to restitution under the primary provision the Commission uses to attack fraud — Section

Make a product that could break? On July 16, 2019, the FTC hosted a workshop to examine repair restrictions on consumer goods and the “Right to Repair” bills proposed in a number of states. Panelists included representatives from trade associations, the repair and technology industries, and state senators. The Nixing the Fix workshop discussed some

Even in her extensive dissent, FTC Commissioner Rebecca Slaughter labeled the Order “exceptional.”

And it is.  The terms of the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) $5 billion, twenty-year settlement Order reached with Facebook on Wednesday is the agency’s most prescriptive privacy and data security agreement ever.  The Order comes just three days shy of the seventh