Federal Trade Commission

On Tuesday, the FTC issued warning letters to three companies selling CBD products.  The companies, which FTC did not identify publicly, allegedly illegally advertised CBD products as being able to treat or cure serious diseases and health conditions without competent and reliable scientific evidence to support such claims. As we have written about previously,

The FTC and the New York Attorney General recently announced a record-setting $170 million ($136 million to the FTC and $34 million to the NY AG) joint settlement with Google. The settlement resolves allegations that YouTube violated the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (“COPPA”) and is the largest penalty the FTC has ever received in

Last week, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit cannonballed directly into the roiling waters of debate over the Federal Trade Commission’s enforcement powers, when it determined in a closely-watched appeal that the agency does not have the right to restitution under the primary provision the Commission uses to attack fraud — Section

Make a product that could break? On July 16, 2019, the FTC hosted a workshop to examine repair restrictions on consumer goods and the “Right to Repair” bills proposed in a number of states. Panelists included representatives from trade associations, the repair and technology industries, and state senators. The Nixing the Fix workshop discussed some

Even in her extensive dissent, FTC Commissioner Rebecca Slaughter labeled the Order “exceptional.”

And it is.  The terms of the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) $5 billion, twenty-year settlement Order reached with Facebook on Wednesday is the agency’s most prescriptive privacy and data security agreement ever.  The Order comes just three days shy of the seventh

“Made in the USA” claims have taken on an even greater importance as American manufacturing has captivated the political discussion. Recently FTC Commissioner Chopra released a statement calling for more stringent enforcement of the agency’s “Made in USA” advertising policies.

Kristi Wolff discusses how to substantiate “Made in USA” claims on the latest episode of

The FTC today announced two new actions under the Consumer Review Fairness Act against companies (CRFA) that allegedly used non-disparagement provisions in consumer form contracts in connection with selling their respective services to help rent properties.  The two actions follow three CRFA actions last month, which we discussed here.

In the complaint against Shore

Kelley Drye & Warren LLP announced the launch of the Ad Law Access podcast – a new podcast from its advertising law and privacy law groups.  Hosted by Kelley Drye attorneys, including Christie Grymes Thompson, Alysa Hutnik, John Villafranco, Gonzalo Mon, and Kristi Wolff, the podcast provides updates on advertising and policy law trends, issues,

On May 17, AdvoCare International LP, marketer of “innovative nutritional, weight-management and sports performance products,” made the extraordinary announcement that it was abandoning its business model. It would no longer engage in multilevel marketing; all sales from here on in would be direct-to-consumer, a single-level marketing compensation plan.

In making this announcement, AdvoCare disclosed

On May 9, the Federal Trade Commission Chairman and Commissioners testified before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce’s Subcommittee on Consumer Protection and Commerce on a number of issues. Reaffirming a previous commitment for increased scrutiny of deceptive “Made in USA” advertising, FTC Chairman Simons told Congress the agency plans to hold a workshop