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On September 27th, the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation held a general oversight hearing of the FTC, which covered a multitude of major policy issues and included testimony from Chairwoman Edith Ramirez, Commissioner Maureen Ohlhausen, and Commissioner Terrell McSweeny.  Chairman John Thune (R-SD) convened the hearing, joined by Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) who sat in for Ranking Member Bill Nelson (D-FL), who was not in attendance.  Several other Committee members also participated in the hearing, cycling through as schedules permitted on what appeared to be a jam-packed day.  Members in attendance included: Senators Dean Heller (R-NV), Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), Brian Shatz (D-HI), Jerry Moran (R-KS), Steve Daines (R-MT), Dan Sullivan (R-AK), Edward Markey (D-MA), Tom Udall (D-NM), Kelly Ayotte (R-NH), Maria Cantwell (D-WA), and Deb Fischer (R-NE).

The CommSenate Committeeissioners’ opening statements focused on key issues related to the agency’s mandate including enforcement, policy development, business education, and competition promotion.  But for members and Commissioners alike, privacy and data security were the clear headline issues of the day.  A variety of related topics were also raised, including protecting children online, the Internet of Things (IOT), tourism, credit reports, telecommunications, and deceptive claims.  A brief summary of these issues follows. 
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Five months ago, Kelley Drye’s Communications practice group launched the Full Spectrum podcast. Since then, they have recorded and posted ten episodes, featuring several different attorneys speaking on the most timely trends and issues in the Communications industry. While the podcast is still new, it has gained a substantial following through iTunes, SoundCloud

There has been an uptick in congressional inquiries regarding privacy concerns in the IoT space.  And most recently in the gaming world of augmented reality.  On Tuesday, Senator Al Franken (D-Minn.) initiated a congressional investigation into Niantic, Inc., maker of the Pokémon Go app that has taken the world by storm.  The app uses a

Connected devices have existed in the marketplace in one form or another for decades (think vending machines or weather sensors). Yet, a confluence of forces in recent years has helped spur a mass proliferation of technology in the “Internet of Things,” and with it, the collection and analytics of big data. Demand is high to

BaconAt last week’s Strata + Hadoop Worldwide Big Data Conference those “in the know” about all things Silicon Valley prophesized that “data is the new bacon.”  Witty comparisons aside, there is no question that big data has matured.  Companies across all industry types are clamoring to leverage every possible gigabyte of available consumer data.  As

Creative abstract healthcare, medicine and cardiology tool concept: laptop or notebook computer PC with medical cardiologic diagnostic test software on screen and stethoscope on black wooden business office table with selective focus effect

In testimony to a Congressional subcommittee last week, FTC Bureau of Consumer Protection Director, Jessica Rich, explained the Commission’s efforts to protect consumers’ health data and repeated the Commission’s request for additional authority to go even further.  Bureau Director Rich began by noting the proliferation of consumer-directed health products, such as websites, wearable technology, and

Cross Device TrackingThis week, a dozen mobile app developers received warning letters from the FTC concerning audio monitoring software used in their apps, but not clearly disclosed to consumers.

The app developers allegedly used software development kits created by a company called SilverPush.  The warning letters explain that SilverPush makes a “Unique Audio Beacon” technology available for

Yesterday, the FTC announced that it had entered into a settlement agreement with Taiwan-based computer hardware manufacturer ASUSTeK Computer Inc., resolving allegations that the company failed to take reasonable steps to secure its routers and cloud services. Such failure, the FTC claims, constitutes an unfair practice, in violation of Section 5 of the FTC Act.