The U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation has scheduled a reading this week of the proposed S. 118 Reinforcing American-Made Products Act of 2017.   The bill proposes to amend the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 to require the Federal Trade Commission’s regulation of the labeling of products as “Made

A recent decision the by the U.S. Court of International Trade (CIT) has important implications for importers, government contractors, and manufacturers that make “Assembled in America” and similar claims. In a ruling against Energizer Battery, Inc., the CIT determined that domestic assembly of foreign component parts does not fulfill the Buy America requirements found

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Massachusetts-based New Balance has long made “Made in the USA” a cornerstone claim for their athletic wear.  The graphic below, from the company’s website, explains exactly what New Balance means by “Made in the USA” – but recently, the company has taken further steps to make clear the importance of this claim to their brand.

This week, the FTC filed a lawsuit against Chemence, Inc., alleging that the company is misleading consumers by claiming that many of their glues are made in the USA.

In order for a company to make an unqualified “Made in USA” claim, a product must be “all or virtually all” made in this country. Although

Today, California Governor Jerry Brown signed SB633 into legislation allowing manufacturers to carry the label “Made in America”, even if their products were not entirely made in the United States. This is similar to the federal standard used in the 49 other states. Specifically, SB633 stipulates that a “Made in USA” claim may be used

This past Monday, October 21, the FTC issued a press release announcing a settlement that the agency reached with Utah-based E.K. Ekcessories, which resolved allegations that E.K. Ekcessories falsely advertised that iPhone accessories, bottle holders, lens cleaners, dog collars, leashes, and other products were “Made in the USA” or “Truly Made in the USA” when,