Last week, NAD launched a new, expedited process that will allow companies to challenge advertising claims made by competitors and get a decision within weeks as opposed to months.  The process, “Single Well-defined Issue Fast Track” or “SWIFT” is limited to single-issue cases, condenses and simplifies the standard NAD timeline and process, and is slightly

This month, NAD announced a decision involving T-Mobile’s ads for its TVision service. The service currently allows subscribers to watch TV over a wired broadband connection, though T-Mobile plans to offer wireless technology in the future. The decision covers a lot of ground, but we’ll focus on some key points related to product and feature

NAD announced that that they are making changes to their filing fees, effective January 1, 2020. The new fees will be as follows:

  • Under $250M: $10,000
  • National Partner: $25,000
  • Under $5B: $30,000
  • Over $5B: $35,000
  • NARB: $25,000

The first category (under $250 million) is a new one, designed to encourage participation from small businesses and

This week, NAD issued a decision in a case involving a commercial for Air Wick Scented Oil that includes some valuable lessons about claim substantiation.

One version of the commercial starts with a family of four engaged in various activities while crowded into a small corner of an otherwise empty living room. A voiceover states:

The National Advertising Review Board (“NARB”) recently upheld an NAD decision regarding Goya Foods, Inc.’s claim, “La Pasta Favorita de Puerto Rico” or “Puerto Rico’s Favorite Pasta,” finding that the claim was not puffery and that it required substantiation. As we summarized here, NAD previously determined that use of the term “favorite”

NAD recently announced a decision involving Pyle Audio’s campaign to generate reviews for its NutriChef brand vacuum sealers. When consumers received their products, they would find a card promising them two rolls of vacuum sealing bags in exchange for leaving a review on Amazon.com. Near that promise, the card included the words “love this” and

If a review site ranks your product as the top in a category, can you advertise that you’re “number 1” in that category? Not necessarily. A recent NAD decision explains why.

A competitor challenged TaxSlayer’s claim that it was “#1 Rated in the Tax Prep Software Category on Trustpilot.” NAD started its decision with a

Kelley Drye & Warren LLP Ad Law Access Podcastannounced the launch of the Ad Law Access podcast – a new podcast from its advertising law and privacy law groups.  Hosted by Kelley Drye attorneys, including Christie Grymes Thompson, Alysa Hutnik, John Villafranco, Gonzalo Mon, and Kristi Wolff, the podcast provides updates on advertising and policy law trends, issues,

We frequently get questions about whether companies can be held liable for claims that appear in consumer reviews. Although it’s clear that there are instances in which a company can be held liable if it has a connection to the person who wrote the review, it has been less clear to what extent a company