California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA)

Key Developments in CCPA Litigation for Q1 2021As we move deeper into the second year of CCPA litigation, the substantive issues continue to develop and we remain focused on the patterns and implications of recent filings and rulings.  In this post, we highlight notable developments in three cases that occurred in the first quarter of 2021.  These cases raise significant issues

California officials today announced their nominees to be the five inaugural members of the California Privacy Protection Agency (“CPPA”) Board.  Created by the California Privacy Rights Act (“CPRA”), the CPPA will become a powerful, state-level privacy regulator long before its enforcement authority becomes effective in 2023, and today’s appointments move the CPPA one large step

California’s Office of Administrative Law approved further revisions to the Attorney General’s CCPA regulations on March 15, 2021. The revisions went into effect upon approval. In substance, the revisions are identical to the fourth set of modifications the Attorney General proposed on December 10, 2020, and make the following changes: (1) Notice for Sale of PI Collected Offline: Businesses that sell personal information collected offline must provide an offline notice by means such as providing paper copies or posting signs in a store, or giving an oral notice if collecting personal information over the phone. (2) Opt-Out Icon: The revised regulations provide that businesses may use an opt-out icon in addition to, but not in lieu of, notice of a right to opt out or a “Do Not Sell My Personal Information” link. (3) Do Not Sell Requests: A “Do Not Sell” request must “be easy for consumers to execute and shall require minimal steps to allow the consumer to opt-out.” The change prohibits businesses from using any method that is designed to or would have the effect of preventing a consumer from opting out. The revised regulation offers examples of prohibited opt-out practices, which include requiring a consumer to: (A) complete more steps to opt out than to re-opt in after a consumer had previously opted out; (B) provide personal information that is not necessary to implement the opt-out request; and (C) read through a list of reasons why he or she shouldn’t opt out before confirming the request. (4) Consumer Requests from Authorized Agents: A business may now require an authorized agent who submits a request to know or delete to provide proof that the consumer gave the agent signed permission to submit a request. The regulations also preserve the options business previously had of requiring the consumer to verify their identity directly to the business or directly confirming that they provided the authorized agent permission to submit the request. (5) Children’s Information: The addition of the word “or” in section 999.332 requires businesses that sell personal information of children under the age of 13 “and/or” between the ages of 13 and 15 to describe in their privacy policies how to make an opt-in to sale requests. We will continue to monitor closely further developments in CCPA regulations.California’s Office of Administrative Law approved further revisions to the Attorney General’s CCPA regulations on March 15, 2021.  The revisions went into effect upon approval.  In substance, the revisions are identical to the fourth set of modifications the Attorney General proposed on December 10, 2020, and make the following changes:

(1) Notice for Sale of

Only two months after finalizing the CCPA regulations, the California Attorney General’s office today released a new set of proposed changes, most significantly addressing “Do Not Sell My Personal Information” requests. The office has also recommended changes to the regulations related to providing notice when businesses collect personal information offline, proof required when an

Prior to the September 30 deadline to sign or veto legislation, California Governor Gavin Newsom recently took action on three bills related to data privacy. Bringing some potential certainty to the dynamic CCPA landscape, Governor Newsom signed into law AB 1281, which provides for the extension of the CCPA’s exemptions related to employee data

On August 30th, the California legislature passed a bill to continue the employee and business-to-business (B2B) exemptions contained in the CCPA for another year. Currently, the CCPA provides two limited exemptions for employee and B2B information, whereby this information is excluded from most CCPA requirements. Both of these exemptions become ineffective January 1, 2021. Assembly

The California Office of Administrative Law today approved the CCPA Regulations that the California Attorney General submitted in June, and the regulations are effective immediately. As we discussed here, the now-final regulations, for the most part, substantively match those that the AG released in March, with a few notable changes.

Significantly, the AG

The replay for our July 30, 2020 California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) for Procrastinators: What You Need To Do Now If You Haven’t Done Anything Yet webinar is available here.

The coronavirus pandemic has put many things on hold, but CCPA enforcement is not one of them. The California Attorney General’s enforcement authority kicked

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January 1, 2020 was the effective date for the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA).  As we reported and summarized in our Q1 2020 CCPA Litigation Round-Up, private litigants wasted no time in filing consumer-related causes of action under the new law.

Here, we provide an update on material developments in that first wave of claims and report on additional private lawsuits commenced in the first half of the year.  We have further categorized the recently-filed cases based on those stemming from a data breach versus not.  In the latter category, the cases are further split based on the underlying alleged violations – last quarter, non-breach based claims related to the disclosures and opt-out mechanisms required by the CCPA as well as the scope of “personal information” covered by the CCPA.

1. Update on Cases Reported in Q1 2020


Continue Reading CCPA Litigation Round-Up: Q2 2020