California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA)

California officials today announced their nominees to be the five inaugural members of the California Privacy Protection Agency (“CPPA”) Board.  Created by the California Privacy Rights Act (“CPRA”), the CPPA will become a powerful, state-level privacy regulator long before its enforcement authority becomes effective in 2023, and today’s appointments move the CPPA one large step

The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) right to non-discrimination explainedThe California Attorney General’s office announced a fourth set of proposed modifications to the CCPA regulations. These modifications: (1) clarify the requirement for businesses that sell personal information that is collected offline to provide offline opt-out notices; and (2) propose an opt-out button for businesses to feature online along with opt-out notices and the “Do

Ad Law Access PodcastAs covered in the blog post “It’s Here: California Voters Approve the CPRA,” California voters passed ballot Proposition 24, the California Privacy Rights Act of 2020 (“CPRA”)  Also known as CCPA 2.0, CPRA brings a number of changes to the CCPA, the majority of which will become operative on January 1, 2023. In

On Tuesday, November 3, 2020, California voters passed ballot Proposition 24, the California Privacy Rights Act of 2020 (“CPRA”). Also known as CCPA 2.0, CPRA brings a number of changes to the CCPA, the majority of which will become operative on January 1, 2023. In addition to revising some of the definitions that are fundamental

California became the first U.S. state with a comprehensive consumer privacy law when the California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”) became operative on January 1, 2020. The CCPA provides for broad privacy rights for residents of California and imposes data protection obligations on companies doing business in California that meet certain criteria.  For further background on

Prior to the September 30 deadline to sign or veto legislation, California Governor Gavin Newsom recently took action on three bills related to data privacy. Bringing some potential certainty to the dynamic CCPA landscape, Governor Newsom signed into law AB 1281, which provides for the extension of the CCPA’s exemptions related to employee data

Ad Law Access PodcastAs covered in this blog post, on June 24, 2020, the Secretary of State of California announced that the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA), had enough votes to be eligible for the November 2020 general election ballot. CPRA is a ballot initiative, which, if adopted, would amend and augment the California Consumer Privacy

The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) right to non-discrimination explainedOn June 24, 2020, the Secretary of State of California announced that the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA), had enough votes to be eligible for the November 2020 general election ballot. CPRA is a ballot initiative, which, if adopted, would amend and augment the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) to increase and clarify the privacy

On June 2, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra announced that he had submitted final CCPA regulations to the Office of Administrative Law (OAL) for review. The final regulations are substantively identical to the second set of modified proposed regulations, which the AG released in March. In addition, the AG issued a Final Statement of Reasons that (1) explains the changes between the first draft and final regulations, and (2) is accompanied by Appendices that respond to each public comment received throughout the rulemaking process – including written comments submitted in response to each draft of proposed regulations and those provided at the four public hearings held in December 2019.

We have described below some of the key provisions of the final regulations, which will impose additional requirements on businesses, service providers, and third parties and data brokers, and likely require the design and implementation of new processes. Whatever hardship the regulations may cause, it is clear that the AG is prioritizing consumer privacy, explaining that the office “has made every effort to limit the burden of the regulations while implementing the CCPA” and does not believe the regulations are “overly onerous or impractical to implement, or that compliance would be overly burdensome or would stifle businesses or innovation.”
Continue Reading CCPA Update: Final Regulations Submitted but No Changes from Prior Draft