Join us on Thursday for a webinar discussing how to operationalize adtech privacy compliance, and learn about other ways you can stay informed.

Operationalizing Adtech Privacy Compliance: Understanding the IAB Multi-State Privacy Agreement

State privacy laws that go into effect in 2023 will significantly change the digital advertising landscape.  These privacy laws require companies to

Last November, the FTC sought public comment on a draft strategic plan for 2022-2026.  As we blogged here and discussed in a comment submitted to the FTC (one of only 21 submitted), a key change from prior strategic plans was deletion of the phrase “without unduly burdening legitimate business activity” from the FTC’s Mission Statement

Food + Personal Care Litigation and Regulatory Highlights – January 2022Welcome to our 2022 inaugural issue of Food and Personal Care Litigation and Regulatory Highlights, where we explore trends and developments from around these industries.  It’s fair to say that the year has started off very busy in both the courtroom and the regulatory arena.  On this chilly winter day, our first stop is in California.

Prop 65

Our friends at Kelley Green Law Blog get the starting position for this issue by highlighting a precipitous uptick in the number of Prop 65 filings over the prior year.  While the Covid-19 pandemic caused all sorts of disruptions to society and the economy, at least one area of business has thrived over the last two years:  private plaintiff enforcement of California Proposition 65.  In 2020-2021, over 40% more Prop 65 actions were brought by private plaintiff “bounty hunters” than in the two years prior to the pandemic (2018-2019).  Compared to a decade ago, private plaintiff groups now initiate three times more Prop 65 actions each year, and five times more than in 2008.  Learn more here about the most frequently cited chemicals and those that are emerging, including PFAS.
Continue Reading Food + Personal Care Litigation and Regulatory Highlights – January 2022

Kick-Off Time for FTC Rulemaking on Earnings ClaimsLast Thursday (February 10), the FTC announced that it “will vote” at its February 17 open meeting to issue an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPR) on “deceptive earnings claims for business ventures, gig or other work opportunities, or educational, coaching or training offerings.” Here’s our take on what we can glean from this announcement

Welcome to our selected regulatory and litigation highlights impacting the food and beverage industry in March 2021.  The food court saw its own brand of March Madness with disputes over food delivery fees kicking off this month’s update.

Litigation Developments

Hidden Delivery Fees

A number of suits were filed in March regarding undisclosed delivery fees. 

At a hearing of the Antitrust Subcommittee of the Senate Judiciary Committee today, Chair Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) emphasized the need for broad antitrust reform. While she rallied bipartisan support to supplement antitrust budgets and encountered little opposition for helping news outlets bargain with social media, prospects for her sweeping S. 225, the Competition and Antitrust

In a significant but unsurprising move, the CFPB announced today that it was rescinding a policy statement issued in January 2020 that sought to tether the Bureau’s “abusive” authority to certain limiting principles.  The move signals that the Bureau is likely to interpret its authority to prevent “abusive acts and practices” under the Dodd-Frank Act

The United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit recently affirmed a West Virginia federal district court’s holding that a plaintiff’s common law tort claim was preempted by the 1976 Medical Device Amendments (“MDA”) to the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (“FDCA”). Under the MDA, certain medical devices, known as Class III devices, are required to receive premarket approval from the Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”).  The MDA also allows the FDA to condition a grant of premarket approval on a requirement that a device meet certain performance standards. The establishment of a performance standard is a formal process that requires publication in the Federal Register and providing interested parties with an opportunity to comment.  The MDA expressly preempts state medical device regulations that are “different from, or in addition to, any [federal] requirement.”

Continue Reading Fourth Circuit Clarifies Scope of Federal Preemption for Requirements Governing Medical Devices

In a unanimous opinion published on January 23, 2012, the Supreme Court reversed the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals and held that a California law prohibiting the sale, processing or holding of a nonambulatory animal was expressly preempted by the Federal Meat Inspection Act (FMIA).

The case, National Meat Association v. Harris, dealt with Section 599f of the California Penal Code, which was enacted in 2008 in response to an undercover video released by the Humane Society showing workers in California kicking and electroshocking sick and disabled cows in an attempt to move the cows. The law makes it a crime for any slaughterhouse to “buy, sell or receive a nonambulatory animal,” or to “process, butcher or sell meat or products of nonambulatory animals for human consumption,” or “hold a nonambulatory animal without taking immediate action to humanely euthanize the animal.”

The National Meat Association (NMA) sued to enjoin enforcement of the law as applied to swine slaughterhouses and argued that the FMIA’s broad express preemption provision prohibited California from enacting distinct requirements for the handling of nonambulatory pigs. The FMIA and implementing regulations enacted by the Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) broadly regulate slaughterhouses to promote meat safety and humane treatment. With respect to the treatment of nonambulatory pigs, FSIS regulations permit slaughterhouses to hold and eventually sell nonambulatory animals, subject to a “post-mortem” examination.

Continue Reading Supreme Court Unanimously Holds California Law Prohibiting Sale, Processing or Holding of Nonambulatory Pigs Expressly Preempted under the Federal Meat Inspection Act