In 2014, Anheuser-Busch ran a contest on Facebook in which consumers were invited to submit photos of themselves “acting natural.” The contest rules stated that entrants could only submit their original works, and that the photos could not infringe anyone else’s copyrights, privacy rights, publicity rights, or other rights. Moreover, the rules stated that entrants

Earlier this year, Airbnb ran a contest in which one winner could “come stay in the former home of Julia Child.” The company LaPitchouneadvertised that entrants could imagine themselves “walking the halls of Julia Child’s former home,” and “channeling the culinary genius of Julia Child,” while “combing over the knick knacks in her kitchen exactly

Last year, Duluth Trading Company ran ads promoting its henley-style shirts that urged customers to “Don a Henley and take it easy.” (Readers of a different generation, take note: Don Henley is one of the singers in the Eagles, and Take it Easy was the band’s first single inHenley 1974.)

If you’ve read our previous

Jennifer Love Hewitt doesn’t love The Marz Group or its vitamin sprays. In fact, last week, the actress sued the company for using her image in ads without authorization.

The Marz Group spent a few minutes in the spotlight on ABC’s Shark Tank, a reality show in which entrepreneurs try to convince investors to

Clients often ask us whether they can mention celebrities in their ad campaigns. A recent Seventh Circuit decision in Michael Jordan’s $5 million lawsuit against Jewel-Osco shows just how risky that can be.

To commemorate Jordan’s 2009 induction into the Basketball Hall of Fame, Time, Inc., the publisher of Sports Illustrated, produced a special issue