State Attorneys General

In January, we reported that the Texas Attorney General had filed a lawsuit against Google alleging that the company engaged iHeartMedia DJs to provide endorsements for its Pixel 4 phone, even though they had never used it. This week, the FTC and several state attorneys general announced settlements with Google and iHeartMedia over the same

Earlier this month at the 2022 NAAG Consumer Protection Fall Conference panelists including current and former AG personnel discussed recent consumer protection legislation and rulemakings that have been implemented or proposed, as well as recent court actions affecting consumer protection laws to provide AGs and staff a year in review.

In the wake of the

On Thursday, November 10th, the Colorado Attorney General’s Office held the first of three stakeholder meetings on its Colorado Privacy Act draft rules. The initial meeting covered Universal Opt Out Mechanisms (UOOMs) and consumer rights. Pre-registered participants were given three minutes to present on each topic. AG staff then posed a variety of

Last week, Attorney General Karl Racine announced a new lawsuit against the Washington Commanders, team owner Dan Snyder, the NFL, and NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell for “colluding to deceive DC residents about an investigation into toxic workplace culture and allegations of sexual assault to maintain a strong fanbase and increase profits.”

The lawsuit claims that

Last week, multiple state Attorneys General (AGs) and staff from offices nationwide gathered in Washington, DC for the National Association of Attorneys General (NAAG) 2022 Consumer Protection Fall Conference. The conference addressed pressing and relevant consumer protection issues facing attorney general offices. The public portion of the conference included a panel of current and former

Early this week, a coalition of 40 attorneys general obtained two multistate settlements with Experian concerning data breaches it experienced in 2012 and 2015 that compromised the personal information of millions of consumers nationwide. The 2012 breach investigation was co-led by the Massachusetts and Illinois AG offices, and the 2015 investigation was co-led by the AGs of Connecticut, DC, Illinois, and Maryland. An additional settlement was reached with T-Mobile in connection with the 2015 Experian breach, which impacted more than 15 million individuals who submitted credit applications with T-Mobile.

In an effort to change corporate behavior, both settlements require Experian and T-Mobile to enhance their data security practices and to pay a combined amount of more than $16 million. Experian has agreed to bolster its due diligence and data security practices by adhering to the following:
Continue Reading AG Settlements Call for Stronger Data Security

Earlier this week, we posted that  a plaintiff filed a proposed class action against the NFL over its automatic renewal practices. The complaint alleges that the NFL used “dark patterns” to enroll consumers in its NFL+ subscription without consent and that it then made it difficult for them to cancel. Although we don’t

Last month, we discussed the broad authority that State Attorneys General have in enforcing price gouging laws – many of which remain in effect given the number of states that are still under some state of emergency.  We noted the significant expansion in recent AG enforcement, and observed that at least two courts had pushed back on these efforts, dismissing cases brought by the Texas and New York Attorneys General.  Just a short month later however, both cases have now been reinstated by appellate courts, again raising the prospects that AGs will continue to push the boundaries in price gouging enforcement, especially while consumers are struggling to deal with high prices due to labor shortages and inflation.
Continue Reading State Attorney General Price Gouging Claims Find New Life

This week, 38 Attorneys General joined forces in a letter promulgated by the National Association of Attorneys General (NAAG) to urge Congress to provide them with authority to address consumers’ frustrations with airlines, further advocating for a shift of federal authority over consumer complaints away from the Department of Transportation.

Stating that the airline industry