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The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced this week that it is seeking comments on proposed amendments to the Privacy Rule and Safeguards Rule under the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (GLBA).  These two rules outline obligations for financial institutions to protect the privacy and security of customer data in their control.  While the proposed changes to the Privacy

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) released a preview of its plans for a standard Privacy Framework this past week.  The purpose of the Framework is to help organizations better manage privacy risks.

The Privacy Framework would breakdown privacy functions into five categories: identify the context of processing, protect private data, control data

The current and future definition of what qualifies as an automatic telephone dialing system (ATDS or autodialer) remains a hotly debated and evaluated issue for every company placing calls and texts, or designing dialer technology, as well as the litigants and jurists already mired in litigation under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA).  Last year, the D.C. Circuit struck down the FCC’s ATDS definition in ACA International v. FCC, Case No. 15-1211 (D.C. Cir. 2019).  Courts since have diverged in approaches on interpreting the ATDS term.  See, e.g., prior discussions of Marks and Dominguez.  All eyes thus remain fixed on the FCC for clarification.

In this post, we revisit the relevant details of the Court’s decision in ACA International, and prior statements of FCC Chairman Ajit Pai concerning the ATDS definition to assess how history may be a guide to how the FCC approaches this issue.


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Last week, the California Assembly’s Standing Committee on Privacy and Consumer Protection held a hearing to discuss the California Consumer Privacy Act. While many panelists from the private sector pointed out problems with the law, a few panelists defended the law, and some suggested that it didn’t go far enough. For example, Stacey Schesser, the

Last week, five advertising and marketing trade associations jointly filed comments with the California Attorney General seeking clarification on provisions within the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA).

While expressing “strong support” for the CCPA’s intent, and noting the online ad industry’s longstanding consumer privacy efforts like the DAA’s YourAdChoices Program, the group proposed the

In the Data Business? You May Be Obligated to Register in Vermont by Thursday

Data brokers have until this Thursday to register with the Vermont Secretary of State as part of a new data broker oversight law that became effective January 1st.

Approved unanimously by the Vermont Senate last May, the Vermont Data Broker Regulation, Act 171 of 2018, requires data brokers to register annually, pay an annual filing fee of $100, and maintain minimum data security standards, but the law does not prevent data brokers from collecting or selling consumer data.

What Qualifies as a “Data Broker”?

The law only applies to “data broker[s],” defined as a “business, or unit or units of a business, separately or together, that knowingly collects and sells or licenses to third parties the brokered personal information of a consumer with whom the business does not have a direct relationship.”
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As we noted previously, the California Attorney General is holding a series of public forums on the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) to provide the public with an initial opportunity to comment on CCPA requirements and the corresponding regulations that the Attorney General must adopt on or before July 1, 2020.  On Friday, January 25, 2019, the Attorney General’s Office held its fourth of six hearings before a full auditorium in Los Angeles.  This blog post summarizes the main themes discussed at the hearing.

Timing/Scope:  For businesses hoping for CCPA clarity and guidance soon, that seems unlikely. California Deputy Attorney General Lisa Kim initiated the hearing, emphasizing that the Attorney General’s Office was in the beginning of its rulemaking process and noting that she anticipated the formal review process not to start until Fall 2019.  For now, the Attorney General’s Office encouraged interested parties to submit comments by the end of February, focusing on subjects within the scope of the Attorney General’s rulemaking responsibilities, as set forth in the CCPA, including:

  • Categories of Personal Information
  • Definition of Unique Identifiers
  • CCPA Exemptions
  • Submitting and Complying with Consumer Requests
  • Uniform Opt-Out Logo/Button
  • Notices and Information to Consumers, including Financial Incentive Offerings
  • Certification of Consumers’ Requests

During the hearing, the Attorney General’s Office displayed this PowerPoint deck, summarizing the CCPA regulatory process.

Main Themes


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On January 10, 2019, Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker signed into law the Massachusetts’s Data Breach Notification Act, which amends Massachusetts data breach reporting laws. The new law, available here, amends the timing and content of individual and regulator data breach notifications, and provides for credit monitoring services when social security numbers may have been

43 State Attorneys General and the District of Columbia announced yesterday a settlement with Neiman Marcus Group LLC resolving the states’ investigation into the company’s 2013 data breach and its security practices. Over a three-month period in 2013, a breach of the Dallas-based retailer exposed customer credit card data at 77 Neiman Marcus stores nationwide.