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On Thursday, June 21, 2018, the U.S. Supreme Court paved the way for states to collect sales or use taxes from sellers with no physical presence in the taxing state by declaring constitutional a South Dakota law requiring out-of-state sellers to remit sales taxes on sales to South Dakota residents if the sellers exceed certain revenue or transaction thresholds.  In South Dakota v. Wayfair, Inc., 585 U.S.             (2018), the Supreme Court overturned its 1967 decision in National Bellas Hess, Incorporated v. Illinois, 386 U.S. 753 (1967) and its 1992 decision in Quill Corporation v. North Dakota, 504 U.S. 298 (1992), which had generally prohibited states from collecting sales or use taxes on sales of tangible personal property from sellers with no physical presence within the state.  The elimination of the physical presence requirement does not necessarily mean that out-of-state sellers now have substantial nexus with all states, however, and sellers should re-evaluate their tax collection and payment obligations on a state-by-state basis.
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