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Seven amendments to the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) are one step closer to becoming law after the California Senate Committee on the Judiciary voted to advance the legislation earlier this month.

The bills now head to the Committee on Appropriations for a vote next month, followed by a vote of the full Senate.  The

California legislators are tweaking language in a proposal to exclude employee or job applicant data from the State’s landmark privacy law slated to take effect in January.

The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) grants consumers the right to access, delete, or opt out of the sale of their personal information collected by a covered business. 

A new bill introduced in the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) Committee would impose federal regulatory obligations on health technology businesses that collect sensitive health information from their service users and customers.

The Protecting Personal Health Data Act, S.1842, introduced by Senators Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) and Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska), seeks to close

On Tuesday and Wednesday of this week, the California Assembly voted to approve four bills to amend the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). The legislation now moves to the California Senate.

In total, the Assembly has approved ten CCPA amendments. Here’s the full list:

Approved by the California Assembly – May 28 & 29

On Wednesday, the California Assembly voted to approve two bills to amend the California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”). The legislation now moves to the California Senate.

In total, the Assembly has approved five CCPA amendments. Four bills remain pending before the full Assembly. Here’s the full list:

Approved by the California Assembly This Week

In February, we posted that the California Attorney General and state Senator Hannah-Beth Jackson had announced a bill that would have materially expanded legal exposure for businesses under the CCPA. The most concerning parts of the bill were the attempts to expand the private right of action to cover privacy practices, while simultaneously removing companies’

A federal judge allowed a class-action lawsuit alleging Bose collected and shared data about its headphone users to proceed last week on the basis of deceptive advertising. The decision underscores the risks that internet of things (IoT) businesses can face if they fail to accurately communicate to consumers how a mobile app or “smart” product

The Danish and Polish data protection authorities issued their first GDPR fines last month. The cases serve as indicators of the kinds of technical violations enforcement officials are looking to deter as they police the EU’s new privacy regulation.

In Denmark, Datatilsynet recommended fining the taxi company Taxa 4×35 nearly $180,000 for failing to delete

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) released a preview of its plans for a standard Privacy Framework this past week.  The purpose of the Framework is to help organizations better manage privacy risks.

The Privacy Framework would breakdown privacy functions into five categories: identify the context of processing, protect private data, control data