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This week, NAD issued a decision in a case involving a commercial for Air Wick Scented Oil that includes some valuable lessons about claim substantiation.

One version of the commercial starts with a family of four engaged in various activities while crowded into a small corner of an otherwise empty living room. A voiceover states:

Last week, the FTC announced that AT&T had agreed to pay $60 million to settle litigation over allegations that the company misled customers by advertising “unlimited” data plans that were subject to significant limitations. If you work in the mobile or broadband spaces, you should check out this analysis by our friends at CommLaw Monitor.

For additional information see the Ad

Yesterday, the FTC released a new guide and video designed to help influencers understand when and how they should disclose the relationships they have to the brands they endorse. The guidance doesn’t break new ground, and readers of this blog shouldn’t find too many surprises, but it does summarize the key requirements in an easy-to-read

This week, the FTC announced a settlement with Sunday Riley Modern Skincare and its CEO, Sunday Riley, over allegations that company managers and employees posted fake reviews on Sephora.com.

The FTC alleged that company managers, including Ms. Riley herself, posted reviews of the company’s products on Sephora.com, and asked other employees do the same. When

In the world of social media, a person’s power is often measured in terms of followers. Because more followers generally means more reach, companies who engage influencers often base their compensation on this metric. But follower counts may not always be what they seem. According to a New York Times report last year, influencers can

On Friday, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed seven legislative proposals to amend the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), marking the end of a nearly-yearlong process to make changes to the new privacy law before it goes into effect on January 1st.  The next opportunity to amend the CCPA will be in the 2020

NAD recently announced a decision involving Pyle Audio’s campaign to generate reviews for its NutriChef brand vacuum sealers. When consumers received their products, they would find a card promising them two rolls of vacuum sealing bags in exchange for leaving a review on Amazon.com. Near that promise, the card included the words “love this” and

If a review site ranks your product as the top in a category, can you advertise that you’re “number 1” in that category? Not necessarily. A recent NAD decision explains why.

A competitor challenged TaxSlayer’s claim that it was “#1 Rated in the Tax Prep Software Category on Trustpilot.” NAD started its decision with a

Last year, we posted that Snapchat’s public relations firm had filed a lawsuit against an influencer who allegedly failed to comply with the terms of his agreement.

According to the agreement, Luka Sabbat was required to make four unique posts, get those posts approved beforehand, send analytics to the firm, and be Lukaphotographed wearing the