California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA)

Seven amendments to the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) are one step closer to becoming law after the California Senate Committee on the Judiciary voted to advance the legislation earlier this month.

The bills now head to the Committee on Appropriations for a vote next month, followed by a vote of the full Senate.  The

On a new episode of the Ad Law Access PodcastAlex Schneider discusses the recently approved (four) bills to amend the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and the Nevada and Maine Legislatures legislation that, like the CCPA, features new requirements relating to the sale of consumer personal data.

For additional information see the Ad

On Tuesday and Wednesday of this week, the California Assembly voted to approve four bills to amend the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). The legislation now moves to the California Senate.

In total, the Assembly has approved ten CCPA amendments. Here’s the full list:

Approved by the California Assembly – May 28 & 29

On April 23, the California Assembly’s Committee on Privacy and Consumer Protection held a hearing to discuss a number of proposed amendments to the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA).  Here are some of the key bills the Committee voted to move forward:

On Tuesday, the California Senate Judiciary Committee will hold a hearing to discuss SB-753, which, if adopted, would carve out from the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA)’s definition of “sale” certain data sharing for purposes of delivering advertising. As we’ve previously noted, the CCPA is intended to afford consumers the right to know

Last week, five advertising and marketing trade associations jointly filed comments with the California Attorney General seeking clarification on provisions within the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA).

While expressing “strong support” for the CCPA’s intent, and noting the online ad industry’s longstanding consumer privacy efforts like the DAA’s YourAdChoices Program, the group proposed the

As we noted previously, the California Attorney General is holding a series of public forums on the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) to provide the public with an initial opportunity to comment on CCPA requirements and the corresponding regulations that the Attorney General must adopt on or before July 1, 2020.  On Friday, January 25, 2019, the Attorney General’s Office held its fourth of six hearings before a full auditorium in Los Angeles.  This blog post summarizes the main themes discussed at the hearing.

Timing/Scope:  For businesses hoping for CCPA clarity and guidance soon, that seems unlikely. California Deputy Attorney General Lisa Kim initiated the hearing, emphasizing that the Attorney General’s Office was in the beginning of its rulemaking process and noting that she anticipated the formal review process not to start until Fall 2019.  For now, the Attorney General’s Office encouraged interested parties to submit comments by the end of February, focusing on subjects within the scope of the Attorney General’s rulemaking responsibilities, as set forth in the CCPA, including:

  • Categories of Personal Information
  • Definition of Unique Identifiers
  • CCPA Exemptions
  • Submitting and Complying with Consumer Requests
  • Uniform Opt-Out Logo/Button
  • Notices and Information to Consumers, including Financial Incentive Offerings
  • Certification of Consumers’ Requests

During the hearing, the Attorney General’s Office displayed this PowerPoint deck, summarizing the CCPA regulatory process.

Main Themes


Continue Reading

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra announced yesterday that the California Department of Justice will hold a series of six public forums on the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA).  The hearings will take place during January and February of this year and will give the public an initial opportunity to comment on the requirements set forth