As we recently blogged here, the FTC’s review of the COPPA rule has been pending for over three years, prompting one group of Senators, in early October, to ask the agency to “Please Update the COPPA Rule Now.” The FTC has not yet responded to that request (at least not publicly) or made any official moves towards resuming its COPPA review. However, the agency is focusing on children’s privacy and safety in other ways, including by hosting a virtual event on October 19 on “Protecting Kids from Stealth Advertising in Digital Media.”

The FTC’s day-long event examined how advertising that is “blurred” with other content online (“stealth advertising”) affects children. Among other things, the event addressed concerns that some advertising in the digital space – such as the use of influencers on social media, product placement in the metaverse, or “advergames” – can be deceptive or unfair because children don’t know that the content is an ad and/or can’t recognize the ad’s impact.

The event focused in particular on: (1) children’s capacity at different ages to recognize advertising content and distinguish it from other content; (2) harms resulting from the inability of children to recognize advertising; (3) what measures can be taken to protect children from blurred advertising content; and (4) the need for, and efficacy of, disclosures as a solution for children of different ages, including the format, timing, placement, wording, and frequency of disclosures. The FTC has also sought public comment on these topics (until November 18).

The event dove deeply into these issues, with help from a range of legal, policy, behavioral, and communications experts. (See here for the agenda and list of panelists.) The discussion was interesting and substantive, and built on actions already undertaken in Europe and California to develop Age-Appropriate Codes governing child-directed content. However, the event left open the question of whether and how the FTC intends to address the issues discussed. Will it proceed via guidance or rulemaking?  If rulemaking, does it plan to use COPPA, the pending Mag-Moss rulemaking on “commercial surveillance,” or some other regulatory vehicle?

All of these options present challenges: COPPA gives parents the tools to control the content that their children see, but generally doesn’t regulate the content itself. Mag-Moss is a long process, which the FTC has made especially complex with its sprawling ANPR. Finally, any rulemaking restricting kids’ advertising could run into the specific Mag-Moss provision (discussed here) limiting the FTC’s regulatory authority in this area. (On the other hand, protecting kids’ privacy and safety tends to be a bipartisan issue, which will assist the agency as it seeks to address these issues.)

Here’s more detail on what happened at the workshop:
Continue Reading Blurred Lines: A Rundown on the FTC Workshop “Protecting Kids from Stealth Advertising in Digital Media”

The replay for our May 19, 2022 Teen Privacy Law Update webinar is available here.

Protecting the privacy and safety of kids and teens online is receiving enormous attention lately from Congress, the States, the FTC, and even the White House.  Further, just last month, BBB National Programs unveiled a Teenage Privacy Program Roadmap

New Federal Bill to Protect Kids’ Privacy: Will This One Break Through?Last October, we blogged that bipartisan momentum was building in Congress to enact stronger privacy protections for children, even if (and especially if) Congress remains stalled on broader federal privacy legislation. Of particular significance, we noted a strong push to protect, not just kids under 13 (the cutoff under COPPA), but also teens.

Since

This week, the FTC announced settlements with two mobile app developers – LAI Systems, LLC and Retro Dreamer (including two of its principals) – concerning allegations that their apps collected childrens’ personal information without obtaining parental consent in violation of COPPA.  These cases are the first in which the FTC has held a company liable