The Federal Trade Commission has long supported advertising industry self-regulation as a means of promoting truthfulness and accuracy in advertising. One of the key aspects of this success has been threat of referral to the FTC: Advertisers that refuse to participate in the self-regulatory process or refuse to comply with recommendations after participating are referred

Last Friday, our friend August Horvath of Foley Hoag presented at an Advertising Self-Regulatory Council (ASRC) conference on consumer perception surveys.  Among the many interesting observations made by August were the following:

  • Over a 5+ year period, June 2013 to present, only 36 cases or 8 percent of total NAD cases, included reference to a

Most Popular Ad Law Access Posts of 2017

As reported in our Ad Law News and Views newsletter, Kelley Drye’s Advertising Law practice posted 106 updates on consumer protection trends, issues, and developments to this blog in 2017. Here are some of the most popular:

The National Advertising Division of the Better Business Bureaus, a self-regulatory body that polices national advertising, recently gave an a-OK to certain dietary supplement immunity claims. The action was initiated under NAD’s partnership with the Council for Responsible Nutrition against dietary supplement maker Olly Public Benefit Corporation.  CRN requested that NAD determine whether Olly had

ASRC President & CEO Lee Peeler has announced the retirement of Andrea C. Levine, Director of the National Advertising Division (NAD). During her 20year tenure, the NAD published more than 2,600 case decisions and built what has been described as the largest body of advertising precedent in the United States.

In announcing

The advertising industry’s self-regulatory system may be “voluntary,” but ignoring NAD’s recommendations—or declining to participate when asked—buys advertisers a prompt referral to the Federal Trade Commission. NAD often touts its close working relationship with the FTC. But what becomes of these referrals from the self-regulatory system? At NAD’s annual conference last month, Mary Engle, the

The NAD recommended that Toys “R” Us modify or discontinue its price-matching claim: “Price Match Guarantee — Spot a lower advertised price? We’ll match it.” The claim was accompanied by a disclosure informing consumers to “see a Team Member for details.” A consumer complained after store employees informed him of limitations to the guarantee. Toys

Between January 2006 and June 2011, the National Advertising Division (NAD) of the Better Business Bureaus found that 71 percent of the consumer perception surveys introduced by parties to an NAD proceeding were unreliable and, therefore, had little or no impact on the final outcome of case. The NAD’s standards for a well-executed survey are